Red Honey

“A little bit country, a little bit rock n roll, Red Honey is led by fiery front woman Erika Jane, who has been making a name for herself across the Southeast as a bold and bluesy torch singer,” writes Prisha Hertzler of Charleston’s Holy City Sinner.

Red Honey and the Pleasure Chest CD

RH_pleasureCDcover (1).jpg
RH_pleasureCDcover (1).jpg

Red Honey and the Pleasure Chest CD

12.00

Song Titles:

  1. 123
  2. Blackbird
  3. Backs to the Wind
  4. Trouble
  5. So Cold
  6. How Can I Love You
  7. Sunny Place
  8. It's True
  9. Bang! Bang!
  10. Muhammad Ali
  11. Daydreaming  

All songs written by Red Honey

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As Written by Alli Marshall in the Mountain Xpress 

September 15, 2013

From the first track, “123,” the almost-slinky sticks-on-rims drumming sets Red Honey and the Pleasure Chest (the new album by local blues/country/rock outfit Red Honey) apart. The percussion explode, full-kit, as guitars warble spacily and front woman Erika Jane Ferraby’s voice accelerates into something of a howl. On the chorus she mimics a train (much cooler and more stylized than that might sound). Her vocal, low and just shy of menacing, often recalls Grace Slick. The song builds slow and mean, either a threat or a promise. Either way, it portends a wild ride.

Red Honey and the Pleasure Chest is informed by a laundry list of influences, and these show up among the album’s 11 tracks. But at its heart, this is a rock project. For the most part, the instrumentation is straight-forward guitar-bass-drums-vocals venture, except for atmospherics introduced by keys and pedals. But those effects reign in any overtly bluesy inclination and also make for smooth transitions between tracks.

“Backs to the Wind” hints at psychedelia with swirling guitar licks and Ferraby’s commanding, marching vocal. The music lilts and sways around her delivery, which ranges from an almost spoken-word approach to echoing, sweeping whoops of sound.

“Bang Bang!” unleashes a maelstrom of cymbals and heavy guitars. Though one of the record’s shortest tracks, it’s also one of the most zealous. But the band’s energy and dynamism can be felt just as well — perhaps more so, on the recording as opposed to a live show — in the mediative peril of “Blackbird.” That song, part stomp and chant, whips and churns from some unfathomable deep. It resounds with tambourine and voodoo.

JUST RELEASED!!!  red honey's new video, blackbird.  

click HERE